Château Mouton Rothschild

Château Mouton Rothschild

Colour: Red
Country: france
Producer: chateau mouton rothschild
Grape: Bordeaux Red Blend
Region: bordeaux
Appellation: pauillac
Vintage
Size

  • 96 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”Tasted at the Mouton-Rothschild vertical in London, the 2012 Mouton-Rothschild clearly has the upper hand over the 2011, if not quite at the level of the 2009, 2010 and what I envisage will be the 2015. There is obviously greater fruit intensity here, as if the contrast has been dialed up a couple of notches. It is quite showy on the nose, preening in its infancy with pure black cherries, graphite and hints of cold slate-like scents, later that hint of seaweed I observed when tasted blind a few months earlier. The palate is beautifully balanced with great vim and vigor. This is a Mouton that will not be put down - vivacious, vivid and delineated with wonderful focus and crucially, impressive persistence on the finish. Do not underestimate this Mouton-Rothschild, because I can see an upswing as it matures in bottle. " Neal Martin

  • 92 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”Tasted at the Mouton-Rothschild vertical in London, the 2011 Mouton-Rothschild is probably the "weakest" of the releases between 2008 and 2012, although that would be unfairly disparaging what is a perfectly respectable, if rather unexciting Mouton. Here, it has those graphite and cedar aromas present and correct, the former a little more accentuated and with a light sea-spray note emerging with time. The palate is well balanced with cedar and a slight peat-like note infusing the black fruit, rigid in its youth but nicely delineated. As I discerned out of barrel, what it lacks is that peacock's tail on the finish, bolting out of the exit door before you have really got to know each other.“ Neil Martin

  • 99 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”Tasted at the Mouton-Rothschild vertical in London, the 2010 Mouton-Rothschild is a modern-day benchmark for the First Growth and here, side-by-side with the 2009, it certainly has its nose in front. It is in possession of quite breathtaking delineation and precision, a crystalline bouquet with black fruit laced with minerals, potent pencil shaving notes, a touch of cold slate. It is totally entrancing. The palate has beguiling symmetry, but for me what really distinguishes this Mouton is its effortlessness. Like watching Usain Bolt in his prime sprinting to another world record, this wine is almost self-effacing in terms of its brilliance. Will Philippe Dhalluin ever better this Mouton-Rothschild?” Neil Martin

  • 97 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”Tasted at the Mouton-Rothschild vertical in London, the 2009 Mouton-Rothschild is a stunning wine. But you know that already. Here I remarked upon its deep co lour vis-a-vis recent vintages. The aromatics have "firmed up" since I last tasted it, takes a little encouragement from the glass, and then its sheer purity washes across the senses. Blackberry and cold stone notes, bilberry and just a touch of graphite that was less noticeable than before. The palate remains weighty in the mouth, extraordinarily dense and yet still utterly composed and beautifully focused, segueing towards an intense spicy finish. I noticed Philippe Dhalluim almost laughing at the quality of this 2009, such is its pedigree and yet will it eclipse the 2010 Mouton-Rothschild? Time will tell. Magnificent.” Neil Martin

  • 98 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”The 2005 Château Mouton-Rothschild is a deeply impressive First Growth. It has been blessed with a sensational nose that comes racing out of the blocks with audacious scents of black fruit, cedar, smoke and pencil box (Philippe Dhalluin mentioned that the signature smokiness/fireside hearth was tangible in around 80% of the vats during élevage). There is a sense of bravura here, of aristocracy. The palate is medium-bodied with sumptuous black fruit, perhaps beginning to soften in texture, one or two years off its plateau. There are layers and layers of black fruit intermingling with graphite and black pepper, and it wisely reins everything in on the finish that is more classic in style and in keeping with the vintage.” Neil Martin

  • 92 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”Last tasted three or four years ago, the 2004 Mouton-Rothschild is a satisfactory wine, even if in my opinion it pales again subsequent success in so-called "challenging" vintages such as 2006 or 2008. It came across tight and broody on the nose, a hint of seaweed tincturing the black fruit, later on a whiff of smoke. It does not feel as refined as either the 2004 Lafite-Rothschild or the 2004 Latour. The palate is medium-bodied and shows more class than the aromatics: cohesive and with just the right amount of grip, a little chewy perhaps but with a pleasant saline sensation towards the "correct" finish. It ticks all the boxes but does not go that extra mile.” Neil Martin

  • 91 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”The 2003 harvest began on September 15 and finished ten days later. The result is an outstanding 2003 Mouton-Rothschild, but it is not one of the superstars of Pauillac or the Northern Médoc. Its nearby neighbors, Lafite-Rothschild, Cos d’Estournel and Montrose, all produced wines that qualitatively dominate this effort from Mouton-Rothschild. Nevertheless, there is a lot to like. The tannins, which were so tough initially, have softened somewhat, and the nose offers up notes of cedarwood, roasted coffee, tobacco leaf and red and blackcurrants. This spicy, earthy, fleshy, medium to full-bodied 2003 is not one of the stars of the vintage. It is close to full maturity, where it should remain for another 10-15 years.” Robert Parker

  • 91 Points - The Wine Advocate

    ”Tasted blind as a vintage comparison at the Valandraud vertical, the 2002 Mouton-Rothschild is a wine that burned brightly in its youth, though recent encounters suggest that maybe it is beginning to flag as it enters what you might call middle age. Here, it has a conservative bouquet with blackberry, cedar, warm bricks and melted tar aromas - an unfussy, uncomplicated, quite serious Pauillac bouquet. The palate is well balanced with crisp acidity. It feels lively on the entry with fine tannin, a Mouton that is nimble on its feet with a gentle grip towards the finish, which offers a satisfying aftertaste of spice and clove. It does not mirror some of the outstanding bottles I consumed within the first decade of its life, and peering into this First Growth, it is difficult to see whether it will repay those who cellar it longer.” Neil Martin

  • 89 Points - The Wine Advocate

    "A blend of 86% Cabernet Sauvignon, 12% Merlot, and 2% Cabernet Franc, the opaque purple-colored, chunky 2001 Mouton-Rothschild does not possess the finesse and stature often achieved by this first-growth. It offers a tell-tale cassis-scented nose, and a monolithic, medium to full-bodied style with relatively high, austere tannin in the finish (a characteristics I also noticed in cask). A dry, angular, backward effort for the vintage, it should be forgotten for at least a decade. Let’s hope the fruit continues to expand and sweeten, but that’s no sure thing.” Robert Parker

  • 96+ Points - The Wine Advocate

    "Perhaps the most beautiful packaging ever on a Bordeaux bottle, Baroness Philippine de Rothschild literally produced a work of art in the gold-engraved bottle of 2000 Mouton Rothschild. Of course, one can’t drink the glass, but this is a top-flight Mouton Rothschild, eclipsed only by the 2006 and 2009. A rich, tannic, earthy style, with loads of creme de cassis and floral notes, the final blend of 86% Cabernet Sauvignon and 14% Merlot is a full-bodied wine with plenty of coffee, earth, chocolatey notes, and still plenty of tannin to resolve. I gave it an anticipated maturity range of 2015-2050 back in 2003, and that looks on target.” Robert Parker

  • 96 Points - The Wine Advocate

    "Like many of its peers, the 1998 has filled out spectacularly. Now in the bottle, this opaque black/purple-colored offering has increased in stature, richness, and size. A blend of 86% Cabernet Sauvignon, 12% Merlot, and 2% Cabernet Franc (57% of the production was utilized), it is an extremely powerful, super-concentrated wine offering notes of roasted espresso, creme de cassis, smoke, new saddle leather, graphite, and liquorice. It is massive, with awesome concentration, mouth-searing tannin levels, and a saturated flavour profile that grips the mouth with considerable intensity. This is a 50-year Mouton, but patience will be required as it will not be close to drinkability for at least a decade. Anticipated maturity: 2012-2050.” Robert Parker

  • 94 Points - The Wine Advocate

    "It is four years since I last tasted the 1996 Château Mouton-Rothschild. Approaching 20 years old, the nose is now open for business but remaining classic in style, a mixture of red and black fruit, hickory, cedar and just a hint of lavender. It is very complex and beautifully defined. The palate is medium-bodied with a slightly herbaceous, undergrowth-tinged opening, the tannins just a little abrasive at the moment, exerting a firmness in the mouth. I feel it is almost as if the palate has not kept pace with the aromatics, requiring more substance to fill out the foursquare finish. If you like a slightly more austere Pauillac then you will adore this, though I don't think it quite reaches the potential that it showed a few years ago.” Robert Parker

  • 100 Points - The Wine Advocate

    "The 1986 Mouton-Rothschild is a blend of 80% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Franc and 2% Petit Verdot that was picked from 2 October until 16 October. Winemaker Philippe Dhalluin, who was not working at the property back then, told me that the pH was fairly low at 3.54 when it is usually around 3.75, due to the natural tartaric acid in the vines. It has a powerful and intense bouquet as always: exemplary graphite and cedar scents, a touch of black pepper and incense. It seems to unfurl in the glass, like a motor revving its engine. The palate is beautifully balanced with its trademark firm tannic structure, a Mouton-Rothschild with backbone and masculinity. Layers of black fruit intermingling with mint and graphite, a hint of licorice emanating from the Merlot, gently fanning out and my God, it is incredibly long. It is not like the 1985 Mouton-Rothschild that is so fleshy and generous. This is serious, aristocratic Mouton, a true vin de garde and yes, I do think drinkers will have to wait until it reaches its true peak. Sometimes that's just the way it is." Robert Parker

Onshore Cellars - ICONIC Producer

Mouton-Rothschild is famous on so many different levels. From the different artists’ work that adorn each vintage label release, to the exuberant character of the late Baroness Philippine de Rothschild and her father Philippe, to its place in the Bordeaux hierarchy and of course to the utterly wonderful wine it makes.

Originally known as Château Brane-Mouton, it was renamed by Nathaniel de Rothschild in 1853 when he purchased it. Just two years later the great classification of Bordeaux for the Exposition Universelle in Paris was created. Nathaniel had begun a series of sweeping changes to improve the property and its wines and recapture the status for which they had been noted for centuries. But the changes weren’t complete when in 1855 the Médoc classification awarded Mouton-Rothschild status as Deuxième Grand Cru Classé. This lead to a long battle to have Mouton recognised for its true worth, which was finally achieved in 1973 by Baron Philippe de Rothschild. The wine was elevated, the first and only change to the classification ever made. The label of 1973 reads: ‘Premier je suis. Second je fus. Mouton ne change’– ‘First, I am. Second, I used to be. Mouton does not change’. Fittingly, somehow, 1973 was the year of Picasso’s death, and so it is his painting that adorns this ever-so famous label.

“The Rothschilds of Château Mouton-Rothschild have been some of the most dynamic, visionary figures in the wine world, unwilling to accept second place and perpetually focused on the horizon. Who else could have rewritten the supposedly unalterable 1855 Classification of Bordeaux to join the select inner circle of first-growths?”The Wine Spectator

Although Mouton means ‘sheep’, and the property and its wine label is flamboyantly endowed with a great deal of ram and sheep motifs, the word actually came from ‘small hill’. It is this hill that provides the perfect exposure to the sun for the vines to create the bottled-magic that is Mouton Rothschild.

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